Ethan Case, a South Dakota State University pharmacy student, poses with peripheral blood stem cells he donated to a leukemia patient he didn't know in Seattle, Washington in March 2022.

South Dakota state pharmacy student supplies stem cells to save a life

When Ethan Case swabbed himself inside his cheek at the South Dakota State University student union in August 2014, he didn’t know that nearly eight years later he would be donating 500 milliliters of peripheral blood stem cells to a leukemia patient. I know, all to save his life.

Case, who received his biology degree from SDSU in 2018 and who will graduate with his doctorate in pharmacy on Friday, was walking through the union building his first year at SDSU in 2014 and saw a booth for Be the Match, the largest. world organization of bone marrow transplant.

He signed up to have a cheek swab, which was then sent to Be the Match, where information about Case’s human leukocyte antigen, a blood protein, was fed into the company’s data system.

Case received no news from Be the Match other than an occasional email until December 2021. It was then that the organization called him to tell him it was a preliminary match for a patient in need of a bone marrow transplant.

Ethan Case, a South Dakota State University pharmacy student, poses with peripheral blood stem cells he donated to a leukemia patient he didn't know in Seattle, Washington in March 2022.

Moreover:USD, SDSU foundations spend thousands on the use of the plane for donors, university officials

The next step was a blood draw to better determine if Case was suitable for the patient in need. She was expecting a call in 30-60 days.

Sixty days later, the organization called Case to inform him.

“To feel that I was the best match for that person was certainly thrilling,” Case said. “I was just very happy that I had the opportunity to help a patient who was going through a lot. We go into the pharmacy hoping we can help people, and I’ve been able to help quite a bit.”

That phone call was followed by other appointments for blood tests, a physical exam, and a detailed medical history.

Ethan Case, a South Dakota State University pharmacy student, poses in front of a sticky gum wall in Seattle, Washington in March 2022 before donating his peripheral blood stem cells to an unfamiliar leukemia patient.

Most recipients do not need the actual bone marrow, but peripheral blood stem cells, according to an SDSU press release. The same blood cells that can be donated from the bone marrow are also found in circulating or peripheral blood, so before donating, a donor takes injections of the drug filgrastim to move more blood cells out of the marrow and into the bloodstream, according to a news release. by SDSU.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.